Understanding the Pomodoro Technique: a Brief Explanation

The Pomodoro technique may sound familiar if you’ve been searching for ways to improve your productivity online. In the ranks of time-saving methods, this technique ranks up there.  Have you ever taken the time to think about just what it is or where it got its start?

Exactly what is the Pomodoro Technique?

Using a basic kitchen timer, the Pomodoro technique is a time-tested method for maximizing productivity. Use a kitchen timer (the tomato-shaped timer from which this technique takes its name) and set it for 25 minutes. This is the time period in which you devote yourself entirely to whatever it is you’re attempting to finish. When the alarm goes off, you have five minutes to relax and regroup.

Following the period of the break, the timer is reset and work resumes. You should rest for 15 to 30 minutes after every four sets (or Pomodoros). This process is repeated until you have achieved your goal.

Who developed this method, anyway?

Francesco Cirillo, a student at the University of the Netherlands, came up with this method because he struggled to find an efficient method of studying. He realized he had to bargain with himself to study for even 10 more minutes. “I’ll give it 10 more minutes of studying and then I’ll reward myself with a short break.”

After some time, he realized that this “bargaining” actually worked. He purchased a kitchen timer and began keeping track of how long his study sessions lasted, ultimately settling on 25 minutes.

Working in short sprints is effective, but you can achieve the same results without resorting to the Pomodoro Technique.

The Pomodoro Technique suggests working in 25-minute intervals, but you may discover that this is too long or too short for your needs.

If you want to get work done in short sprints, you don’t have to resort to the Pomodoro technique. Both your work periods and their accompanying breaks are flexible, depending on your preferences. One of the great things about the Pomodoro technique is that it can be modified to suit anyone’s specific needs.

You will profit from using a timing system, whether you use the Pomodoro approach or come up with your own. Get a timer and break up your next project into manageable chunks.

 

3 Tips for Getting Things Done

Is there one person in your circle of friends who seems to breeze through even the most challenging tasks? Are you curious about their methods? Because they appear get a lot done!

Here are three strategies that can boost your productivity to the level of your most successful peers.

Observe Rest Periods

In spite of appearances, taking a break can actually increase your productivity. When you give your mind some downtime for relaxation and inspiration, it can perform at its peak. Taking short breaks throughout the workday can help. Try for once an hour if possible, but more often is fine as well.

Stop what you’re doing and go to the restroom, grab a bite to eat, or get some exercise during your break. Experiment with different interval lengths to determine how often you need to rest your mind, and then adhere as closely as you can to that schedule.

Timed sprint of work

Setting a timer for each work session is just as important as taking frequent breaks. Set the timer for a short period of time, no more than 20 or 25 minutes. It doesn’t matter what time it is. Working out the optimal duration of your work sessions will require some trial and error. Creating manageable sub-goals can boost your motivation and make the overall task seem more manageable. You’ll be more productive if you know you have to beat the clock.

Also, if you have trouble getting started, remind yourself that you’ll only have to focus on your work for 20 minutes at a time. This should put you in a much better frame of mind in which to get things done.

Reduce Outside Distractions

People who are easily distracted can benefit from working in short sprints. Reducing the number of potential interruptions in your work space is also helpful. You should turn off email alerts and check your inbox at a set time every day. Don’t bring your personal electronics like TVs or phones to the office. Do not eat at your desk.

Don’t waste your mealtime doing this when you could be relaxing instead.

In addition, having a specific place to work can help signal to your brain that it is time to get down to business.

If you take frequent breaks, work in short sprints, and eliminate distractions, you’ll find that increased productivity finds you even when it seems impossible. Soon you’ll be like that one friend who always seems to get everything done, leaving everyone else scratching their heads and wondering what they’re doing differently.

Being More Efficient With Your Time

Personal experience has shown one true thing: maximizing your productivity, happiness, peace, or impact can best be accomplished if you clearly understand the Rules of Time.

Being more efficient with your time is irrelevant if you don’t know how you want to spend it. In managing time, the desired objective is more important than the clock. To paraphrase Mr. Gary Vaynerchuck, know where you want to go and spend your time on the things that get you there.

The way we can lock in those things to get us there include the following:

  1. HAVE GOALS

Being more efficient with your time is irrelevant if you don’t know how you want to spend it. In managing time, the “compass is more important than the clock”. Know where you want to go and put your energy into those things that will ensure your success. (more…)